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United Nations Summit for Refugees and Migrants - September 20, 2016
US President Obama urges world to eschew division and pursue global integration at UN Assembly

NEW YORK (USA) - In his final address to the United Nations General Assembly as United States President, Barack Obama today delivered a ringing appeal for global integration in the face of religious fundamentalism, the politics of ethnicity, aggressive nationalism and crude populism, even as he called for a course correction. He also referred to current crises tearing the world apart, including “Russia attempting to recover lost glory through force” by interfering in the affairs of its neighbours, and the South China Sea, where “a peaceful resolution of disputes offered by law will mean far greater stability than the militarization of a few rocks and reefs.”


“At this moment, we all face a choice. We can choose to press forward with a better model of cooperation and integration. Or we can retreat into a world sharply divided, and ultimately in conflict, along age-old lines of nation and tribe and race and religion,” he said, declaring that the spirit behind the founding of the UN itself shows what is best in humanity.

“As imperfect as they are, the principles of open markets and accountable governance, ofdemocracy and human rights and international law that we have forged, remain the firmest foundation for human progress in this century,” he told world leaders on the first day of the Assembly’s annual general debate, his eighth.

“The integration of our global economy has made life better for billions of men, women and children. Over the last 25 years, the number of people living in extreme poverty has been cut from nearly 40 per cent of humanity to under 10 per cent. That's unprecedented. And it's not an abstraction. It means children have enough to eat; mothers don’t die in childbirth.”

But in order to move forward it has to be acknowledged that the existing path requires a course correction. “A world in which one per cent of humanity controls as much wealth as the other 99 per cent will never be stable,” Mr. Obama stressed, calling for a global economy that works for all people.

“Just as we benefit by combatting inequality within our countries, I believe advanced economies still need to do more to close the gap between rich and poor nations around the globe. This is difficult politically. It's difficult to spend on foreign assistance. But I do not believe this is charity,” he stressed.

“For the small fraction of what we spent at war in Iraq, we could support institutions so that fragile States don’t collapse in the first place; and invest in emerging economies that become markets for our goods. It's not just the right thing to do – it's the smart thing to do,” said Mr. Obama.

He called for rejection of all forms of fundamentalism, racism, and belief in ethnic superiority that make traditional identities irreconcilable with modernity. While laying out his general vision for a better world, Mr. Obama touched on specifics including the vital need to combat climate change by building on the accord reached in Paris last December and the duty of the wealthiest countries to help poorer nations leapfrog destructive forms of energy.

He also referred to current crises tearing the world apart, including “Russia attempting to recover lost glory through force” by interfering in the affairs of its neighbours, and the South China Sea, where “a peaceful resolution of disputes offered by law will mean far greater stability than the militarization of a few rocks and reefs.”

In Syria, he said, there is no ultimate military victory to be won, and the hard work of diplomacy must stop the violence, and deliver aid to those in need. “And surely, Israelis and Palestinians will be better off if Palestinians reject incitement and recognize the legitimacy of Israel, but Israel recognizes that it cannot permanently occupy and settle Palestinian land,” he added.

But the main thrust of his remarks remained the need for overall global cooperation as inspired by the founding of the UN itself, even if this means curbing the power of the strongest countries.

“We can only realize the promise of this institution’s founding – to replace the ravages of war with cooperation – if powerful nations like my own accept constraints,” Mr. Obama declared “Sometimes I'm criticized in my own country for professing a belief in international norms and multilateral institutions. “But I am convinced that in the long run, giving up some freedom of action – not giving up our ability to protect ourselves or pursue our core interests, but binding ourselves to international rules over the long term – enhances our security. And I think that's not just true for us,” he added.

“The choices of individual human beings created a United Nations, so that a war like [the Second World War] that would never happen again. Each of us as leaders, each nation, can choose to reject those who appeal to our worst impulses and embrace those who appeal to our best. For we have shown that we can choose a better history,” Mr. Obama concluded.


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United Nations Summit for Refugees and Migrants - September 20, 2016
The 193-member UN General Assembly is expected to adopt a political declaration on migrants and refugees

NEW YORK (USA) - President Barack Obama will host a Leaders’ Summit on the Global Refugee Crisis on the margins of UNGA 71 on September 20, 2016 to galvanize significant new global commitments to: 1) increase funding to humanitarian appeals and international organizations, 2) admit more refugees through resettlement or other legal pathways, and 3) increase refugees’ self-reliance and inclusion through opportunities for education and legal work. The 193-member UN General Assembly is expected to adopt a political declaration on migrants and refugees but it won’t be legally binding.


On 19 September 2016 the United Nations General Assembly will convene a High-Level Plenary to address large movements of refugees (UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants) on 19 September 2016 in light of the need for greater international solidarity and support in response to such movements.

The Secretary-General’s Report In Safety and Dignity: Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants was released in May 2016 and served as a basis for negotiations by Member States who agreed to a draft New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants which is expected to be adopted at the 19 September Summit.

The New York Declaration sets out principles and recommendations applying to both migrants and refugees (rescue en route, reception at borders, combatting xenophobia and encouraging inclusion) as well as separate commitments for migrants and refugees, and its two annexes pave the way for global compacts on refugees and migrants respectively in 2018. Regarding migration, the Declaration urges states to enhance migration management and governance, to strengthen international cooperation, and to address the needs of migrants in particularly vulnerable situations.

With regard to refugees, the New York Declaration sets out a new approach to responding to refugees through a Comprehensive Refugee Response (CRR) Framework. This CRR Framework, detailed in an annex to the Declaration, includes a full range of activities, from addressing root causes to emphasizing self-reliance of refugees to considering solutions from the beginning of a refugee influx, to be implemented through whole of society engagement. The Declaration commits states to greater responsibility sharing and to work towards the adoption in 2018 of a Global Compact on refugees.

World leaders hold UN summit on refugee crisis. Over 65 million refugees world wide. Aid chiefs call for “dependable humanitarian funding”. Syrian refugees living in a camp in the Bekaa Valley in eastern Lebanon just want to go home.

That’s their message to world leaders who meet today in New York at the start of a UN summit that is set to discuss their fate and that of 65 million others. But those living in the camps aren’t expecting much to change: “We only have faith is in God. These summits are never useful for us. They hold them only as a show for themselves.” Syrian refugees in Jordon feel the same hopelessness.

“With all these meetings, the world was unable to allow humanitarian aid into Aleppo. The whole world could not get aid there. So to solve a problem that has been going on for more than five years, I say it’s impossible,” said one refugee living in Zaatari. Aid chiefs are calling on rich countries to shoulder their fair share of taking in refugees. They are also calling for dependable humanitarian funding. A report by a leading anti-poverty group ““The ONE Campaign” says goals such as tackling disease and ending extreme poverty by 2030 may slip down the agenda as donor governments shif funds away from long-term development aid. The 193-member UN General Assembly is expected to adopt a political declaration on migrants and refugees but it won’t be legally binding.


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Emirates migliore linea aerea del mondo. L'annuncio da Skytrax World Airline Awards 2016. Questa è la quarta volta che Emirates vince il miglior riconoscimento da quando i premi sono stati introdotti 15 anni fa; la compagnia ha vinto il primo riconoscimento Skytrax come Migliore compagnia al mondo nel 2001, ancora nel 2002 e nel 2013. In totale, Emirates ha vinto un totale di 20 premi Skytrax World Airline dal 2001. (Continua...)